Amy's Journey- A Guest Blog Post About Recovery

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Thursday, September 01, 2016

Many of you will identify with some of what Amy has to share about her journey to making peace with food and her body. I hope you'll enjoy reading it. I know I did!

I'm a pretty impatient person. I don't really understand people who enjoy the journey... I just want to get to the destination. I just want to be THERE ... that illusive place where satisfaction and contentment live. I've learned that is part of my nature and I'm best served to learn how to work within it and manage it, and stop fighting it.

When I started working with Sarah @ MarciRD, I had that same mindset. I wanted my struggle with food to end – like after a visit or two. :) I wanted to be fixed, healed, whatever – I just wanted to be done with 30 years of battling with food. Imagine my surprise when 2 years later, I am still walking through that door to a neat little office in Cambridge to talk with Sarah.

My first ever visit I was introduced to Intuitive Eating and what it meant to let go of the diet mentality. Of what it meant to give myself permission to eat anything I wanted (at this point I felt scared to death and giddy at the same time!). What do you mean I can eat what I want? What kind of diet it this? Where are the rules, the restrictions? Oh so thankfully, they are out the door with IE. I have found peace with marshmallow fluff. Oreos no longer hold power over me!! I learned to sit, eat, and enjoy food. To really taste food – and use all my senses at a meal. To slow down. And to listen to my body, and trust that it would tell me when I was full. All of this is the complete opposite of what the diet industry tells us – that we need "them", their plan, and their regiment and without it we'll never do it, or we'll fail. It's a lie! There is piece inside of us that knows what we need. We just have to be quiet and listen for that voice to come out! And really, we have to be willing to take the journey ... ugh. And do the work. Bigger ugh.

I have shed a lot of tears in Sarah's office, doing the work. I have laughed, gotten frustrated with myself, fallen back into old habits, been angry with myself and so much more, more times that I can count. Eventually, I listened. I learned. I changed the way I talked to myself. I started paying attention to how different foods made me feel after I ate them. I dug in and figured out why I had struggled for so many years in the yo-yo diet world ... why I binged on certain foods. I forgave the little girl who started sneaking food when she was only 10, and the mom who put her on a diet at that same age. It makes a lot more sense now. I started living true to my nature and honoring the woman I am today. I began being grateful for my fat! Imagine? Because for all the things I went through as a little girl into my teen years, all I got was fat... and it could have been so much worse. I stopped fighting against my fat and started being grateful for all that I am and all I have learned along the way. Aye yiyi ... I started enjoying the journey.

I want to leave you with a paragraph from one of my favorite books, Imagine Heaven by John Burke. What if you saw yourself in a way that was loving, full of grace and full of forgiveness?

"Knowing how God sees you, sets you free to accomplish the things that God created you to accomplish. It sets you free to use your unique gifts, time and resources to make an impact that lasts for eternity – not to prove that you're worth something, but because you're worth EVERYTHING to God. "God saved you by his grace when you believed. And you can't take credit for this, it is a gift from God... For we are God's masterpiece. He has created us anew in Christ Jesus, so we can do the things he planned for us long ago. Ephesians 2:8-10".


How Do I Know if I'm Hungry?

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Sunday, August 14, 2016

How do you know you're hungry? I know it sounds like an odd question but I'm always amazed at the answers I get to this seemingly simple question. Think about it a moment. Imagine I just asked you "how do you know you're hungry?" What would you say?  

I talk about hunger a fair amount. Certainly more than the average person since I happen to be a nutrition therapist for a living. :) And perhaps more than other dietitians because I use an intuitive eating approach to my work. That means I work with my clients to help them connect to the process of eating when hungry, stopping when full, and learning to manage their emotions without using food. Perhaps it sounds simple but it can be a surprisingly complex process!

There are many things in life that can derail us from eating in response to a physical cue for hunger: not being able to identify hunger, eating based on the time of day, habits, chaotic schedules, emotions, and even dieting. I'm sure you could add to the list.

In an ideal world, we'd eat in response to a hunger cue the majority of the time. Note: not 100% of the time. Sometimes we eat for fun and social reasons. But hopefully most of our eating is done because our bodies and brains need more fuel. So my purpose in writing this blog post is to help you become more aware of your personal cues of hunger. Believe it or not, your hunger cues are just as individual as you are! And learning your own personal cues for hunger is the first step to eating intuitively.

So, here is your homework assignment. Get out a sheet of paper and write the following:



Meal hungry:

Snack hungry:

Now, I want you to write down as many PHYSICAL descriptors as you can for each category. I'll give you some examples.

Starving: stomach pain, headache, terrible mood, no energy

Over-hungry: growling/empty stomach, shaky, can't think of anything but eating

Meal hungry: grumbly stomach, lack of concentration, low energy, mouth watering at the thought of food

Snack hungry: distracted thinking, energy dip, little grumbles in stomach

Ok, the next step is to keep this paper around for a week or so. Throughout the week pay attention to moments that you think you might be in one of these categories and ask yourself the following questions:

1. Am I hungry?

2. How hungry am I?

3. How do I know? This "how do I know" part is your cue to write down any physical descriptor you have that fits your particular level of hunger.

The last step is extremely important because you are creating an individualized list of how your body speaks to you. Try to pay attention for a week or so and see what data you gather. You might notice that you need to make changes to your list as you go along.

What are your greatest obstacles to eating in response to hunger? I'd love to hear your feedback!

Your nutritionist in Cambridge,


Healing the Hate: A Better Body Image for 2016

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Monday, July 25, 2016

This post originally debuted in January and with the heat of summer upon us I had to re-share it.

Key Point: You cannot talk your way to better body image. If you treat yourself with hate you will continue to feel hate towards your body. In this video blog I share with you the why and the how to improve your body image through actionable steps.

After you view this video blog, I hope you will share what you plan to start doing that feels good to your body. What action step or steps will you start making today?


NEW Online Eating Disorder Training for Dietitians and Dietetic Students

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Wednesday, June 01, 2016


10% off until August 1st!


I am incredibly excited to announce the launch of my Eating Disorders Online Training today!

Whether you’ve been practicing for 20 years, or you’re a dietetic student or intern, the chances are high that you’ve received zero training on how to counsel people with eating disorders. Given that nearly 10% of the US populations falls along the ED spectrum (not to mention subclinical EDs) this is a huge problem!

I am Certified Eating Disorder Dietitian and IAEDP Approved Supervisor. I developed this 5 part series because I know that clients with eating disorders NEED a skilled, confident, and capable dietitian. And the purpose of this 5 part series is to lay the groundwork for you to start to develop the necessary skills to begin working with this population.

You’ll get 7.5 CEUS in this 5 part series during which I’ll cover topics including:

  • Assessment
  • Diagnosis
  • Integrating therapeutic techniques appropriately into nutrition counseling
  • How to effectively communicate and assert yourself within the context of a treatment team
  • Developing a nutrition prescription and food plan
  • Dealing with co-occurring medical and mental health diagnoses
  • Food exposures
  • Body Image
  • Metabolism
  • Exercise
  • And so much more!

Don’t have time to watch all 5 training videos sequentially? No problem--you can also pick one specific topic you want to focus on, rather than purchasing the entire series. You can also choose whether you want to rent or buy each video for future reference.

My hope is that you will find the training as helpful as the other dietitians who have already taken my online and live courses. My goal is that you walk away feeling more confident, more capable, and more empowered to treat people suffering from eating disorders.

You can learn more about my online training by visiting my site:

National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2016 & Sarah Patten

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Saturday, February 27, 2016

Sarah Patten is a passionate eating disorder specialist who works with me in my practice. She is going to close out National Eating Disorders Awareness Week 2016 by sharing with each of you "The One Thing She Wishes People Knew About Eating Disorders." Take it away Sarah!

Picture Source

Typically, when a person finds out that I'm a dietitian, I'm instantly assaulted with a barrage of questions regarding nutrition, the latest diet fads or super foods, and what my job actually entails day to day. When they learn that I don't endorse diets, food fads, or even promote weight loss and instead work with those struggling with eating disorders or disordered eating, the questions continue - but take on a different tone of curiosity and misunderstanding.

It never ceases to amaze me that eating disorders, which effect roughly 30 million Americans and have the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric illness, remain so mysterious to the general population. There is so much information that I wish I could convey to the world about eating disorders. So much insight and understanding that might foster greater compassion for those struggling and perhaps even increase the minimal research funding allotted to fighting this serious condition. My mind overflows with misconceptions I could correct or statistics I could offer to help educate, but when asked to consider the ONE thing that I wish people knew about eating disorders, the answer is simple:


Eating disorders are not limited to society's perception of the anorectic body type – but instead are rampant in people of all shapes and sizes. And although weight loss and a malnourished appearance can definitely be a serious indicator of an eating disorder, weight is by no means the only measure of the extent to which a person is suffering. For those struggling with an eating disorder, the reinforcement of this narrow belief contributes to feelings of “not being sick enough/thin enough/starved enough” or beliefs that “I don't have an eating disorder if I'm not “underweight” or emaciated.”

How can this knowledge help us? For starters, it can help us to be aware that we simply can't make assumptions about a person's relationship with food based on their body size. With this knowledge, we can work towards changing the way we might comment on another person's body, whether to their face or behind their back. Be mindful that your seemingly innocent comment on a coworker's weight loss may actually be interpreted very differently than you intended. Let's compliment other's on their strengths, praise their contributions, and appreciate their personality rather than focus on what their body looks like.

For those struggling with an eating disorder, hopefully this message will help you to challenge that internal critic telling you that you're not “sick enough” or “worthy of help or support” because of what your body looks like or what the scale says. Your weight in no way reflects your worth and certainly doesn't dictate your need for support. Healing from an eating disorder means learning to love, accept, and most importantly CARE for yourself no matter what your body looks like – you're worth it.