Body Positive & Weight Loss

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Thursday, October 27, 2016

 

Body Positive. It seems to be a term that’s getting a little more press these days. As a self-described “body positive dietitian” you’d think I’d be thrilled! Truthfully, I’m conflicted. I’m conflicted because “body positive” began as a term used to promote body inclusivity, meaning all bodies (fat, thin, short, tall, able-bodied or not) deserve respect AND don’t need changing. Yup, body positive means I’m going to take good care of my body just as it is today and love it fiercely, without any agenda of making it look different.


And now, “body positive” has been swallowed whole, contorted, and used by every weight loss agenda out there. Just as I’ve seen Special K try to trick you into the idea that they want you to love your body as it is (nope they want you to eat it twice a day as part of some stupid diet scheme so their stock prices soar, hate to break it to you, they don’t actually care about your health and well-being), dietitians are hashtagging their instagram posts with #bodypositive #weightloss.

 

Let me say it loud and clear. NO NO NO NO. Body positive is not loving yourself thin. That is a big load of BS which I refuse to eat for breakfast or let slide in my Instagram feed without saying anything.

 

To me, Body Positive means I make choices that serve my overall health and well-being from the inside, not the outside. Body Positive doesn’t worry whether improved self-care results in weight loss because every body is different. Sometimes improved self-care leads to body changes and sometimes it doesn’t. Body Positive is about being your own unique self, not making changes to make yourself look like every other idealized image we’re forced to contend with. Body Positive is expansive and inclusive, not reductionist or “better than.” Body Positive is an experience, not a number.

 

So the next time you wonder whether or not Body Positive and a weight loss agenda can co-exist, you can hear me say “No.” Body Positive is inherently weight neutral. Those of us in the Body Positive movement have so much more on our minds than the number on the scale.

 

Spring Peanut Pad Thai

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Tuesday, April 26, 2016

I LOVE Thai food. It's perhaps my favorite cuisine and almost always sounds delicious. While thumbing through my Food and Nutrition Magazine I came across a Spring-inspired homemade version of Pad Thai. As my readers know, I don't like to spend loads of time in the kitchen. But this recipe sounded easy enough plus it looked yummy and like it would make enough for leftovers.

Photo Source  // Photo by Scott Payne // Food Styling by Susan Skoog

Holy crap. It was AWESOME. Like, lick the plate kind of awesome. It was developed by a fellow dietitian Alexandra Caspero. You can check out her website Delicious Knowledge for super yummy recipes. She has a really beautiful website packed with easy to follow recipes that are brimming with flavor and nutrition. Her recipes are all vegetarian and vegan which to be honest, isn't my typical go-to. But something to bear in mind if you browse her site.

So here is my latest and favorite spring time recipe. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. If cooking up Pad Thai from scratch just feels a bit overwhelming, try ordering your favorite take-out version and add some roasted asparagus and Spring peas!

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces flat rice noodles (brown rice preferred)
  • ¼ cup low-sodium creamy peanut butter
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons (45 milliliters) rice vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons (45 milliliters) reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon (15 milliliters) sesame oil
  • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • ¼ cup (60 milliliters) hot water
  • 1 tablespoon (15 milliliters) canola oil
  • ⅓ cup scallions, chopped, including white and green parts
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 8 ounces trimmed asparagus, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 1 large lime, juiced (about 2 tablespoons / 30 milliliters juice)
  • ½ cup roasted peanuts, lightly salted, roughly chopped
  • ¼ cup cilantro, chopped

Directions

  • Prepare rice noodles according to package instructions. Pour noodles into a colander and let drain.
  • Meanwhile, make sauce by whisking peanut butter, ginger, garlic, brown sugar, rice vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil and crushed red pepper flakes in a medium bowl.
  • Slowly whisk in hot water and stir until sauce is blended. Set aside.
  • In a large wok, heat canola oil over medium heat. Add scallions and cook until fragrant, about 1 to 2 minutes. Add garlic and cook for 30 seconds. Pour in eggs and stir to scramble for about 2 minutes or until soft. Add asparagus and peas and cook for 3 to 5 minutes, stirring often, until asparagus is tender.
  • Add drained noodles and sauce and cook for 1 to 2 minutes, tossing until the liquid has been absorbed. Stir in lime juice.
  • Transfer cooked noodles and vegetables to a large platter or bowl and garnish with peanuts and cilantro. Serve immediately. Serves 6.

 

 

 

Cooking Note

This dish comes together quickly, so be sure to chop and prep all ingredients before cooking.


Help! I Am Addicted to Food

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Tuesday, March 01, 2016

 

I have blogged about food addiction before. You can read previous posts here and here. But I recently had the opportunity to serve as a guest on my colleague and friend Julie Duffy Dillon's Love, Food Podcast. (If you haven't already subscribed, I totally encourage you to do so!) 

In this episode, Julie and I tease through a letter written by a woman who feels completely controlled by food and wonders if she is in fact a food addict. Together we talk about the current state of food addiction research and provide this writer with some practical tips. I think you'll like it! 

Here is a link to the episode. But you can also access it on your phone through iTunes, Stitcher, or wherever you typically get your podcasts. Please tune in and let me know what you liked or didn't like!

Product Showcase: Building Your Anti-Dieting Community

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Friday, February 05, 2016


Image Source

In this Product Showcase I provide you with four resources to build your anti-diet community. And if you are trying to get off the dieting train, you know it takes fortitutde and a lot of positive reinforcement in this toxic and obsessed culture we live in. I review the book "The Gluten Lie" by Alan Levinovitz as well as 3 new podcasts. Check out my video blog below where I review each of these products in detail. At the end of this post I will also provide links to the podcasts.

Good luck as you develop your own go-to resources to help you stay sane in the often stressful world of food, nutrition, exercise, and body image!

 

Below are the list of podcasts I think are pretty awesome! They are by Registered Dietitian Nutritionists who believe in Intuitive Eating, Health At Every Size, and breaking out of dietland. 


 

Food Psych - A Podcast about Nutrition, Eating Disorders & Food Psychology

By Christy Harrison, MPH, RD, CDN - Certified Nutritionist and Intuitive Eating Counselor


 

 

The Love, Food Podcast: Peace from emotional eating, binge eating, eating disorders, and negative body image

By Julie Duffy Dillon: Registered Dietitian, Food Behavior Expert, Body Image Guru


 

Body Kindness Podcast

By Rebecca Scritchfield Registered Dietitian and Health & Happiness Expert
 

 

Big Butts, Burgers, & Weight Stigma

  • posted by Marci Evans
  • Wednesday, September 23, 2015


Are you interested in hearing my take on weight stigma? Check out my video below! In honor of weight stigma awareness week I tackle some tough topics and share with you some important research. But in addition to this video, there are some absolutely amazing blog posts I'd encourage you to read. I have been blown away by the content that the Binge Eating Disorder Association has gathered and organized for this year's event. They share research, personal stories, and lessons on advocacy on a wide range of issues. So dive in and share what you learn with those around you. Let's keep this conversation going!